Safety Resources
For Myself
Here are a few things you can do to stay safe on Facebook:
  1. Learn how to use Facebook's privacy shortcuts and settings to comfortably share and connect with others.
  2. Learn how to recognize sensitive content and behavior and how to report it.
  3. Remember these simple rules about staying safe online:
    • Never share your password.
    • Think before you post.
    • Adjust your privacy settings and review them often.
    • Only accept friend requests from people you know personally.
    • Report things that look suspicious.
There are also several resources available to you regarding internet safety including:
  • Facebook's Bullying Prevention Hub provides resources and tips that help teens, parents and educators deal with bullying behavior and its consequences.
  • A Thin Line: MTV's A Thin Line campaign empowers kids to identify, respond to and stop the spread of digital abuse in their own lives and among their peers. The campaign is built on the understanding that there's a "thin line" between what may begin as a harmless joke and something that could end up having a serious impact.
  • Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP) works to track and bring offenders to account either directly or in partnership with local and international forces.
  • Childnet International works to track and bring offenders to account either directly or in partnership with local and international forces.
  • Commonsense.org provides trustworthy information, education and an independent voice helping kids thrive in a world of media and technology.
  • ConnectSafely.org is an online forum designed to give teens and parents a voice in the public discussion about youth online. It also offers social-media safety tips for teens and parents, the latest youth-tech news and many other resources.
  • Cyberbullying Research Center provides up-to-date information about the nature, extent, causes and consequences of cyberbullying among adolescents and serves as a clearinghouse of information about the ways adolescents use and misuse technology.
  • FOSI.org works to make the online world safer for kids and families by identifying and promoting best practices, tools and methods that respect free expression in the field of online safety.
  • NCMEC.org serves as the US’s resource on missing and sexually exploited children, providing information and resources to law enforcement and other professionals, parents and children, including child victims.
  • OnguardOnline.gov is a program of the (US) Federal Trade Commission that provides practical tips from the government and technology industry on protecting against internet fraud.
  • UK Council for Child Internet Safety is a collection of resources.
  • WiredSafety is a nonprofit providing innovative and effective tools to help young people make wise choices in a world of media and technology. Three popular programs are STOP cyberbullying, Teenangels and WiredCops.
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We worked with ConnectSafely.org on the following answer.
First, never agree to anything that makes you uncomfortable. Even if someone seems like a friend, they’re not a friend if they’re trying to get you to do anything against your will or best interests.
It’s hard to make a good decision when you’re upset or confused, so you should be as clear as possible in your own mind about what is and isn’t in your own interests. If you need help with this, talk to someone you trust like a close friend, family member or counselor.
  • If you receive any unwanted sexual comments or communication on Facebook, the best thing you can do is remove yourself from the conversation. If it doesn’t stop immediately, you should block the person and report the abusive content to Facebook.
  • If someone is asking you to share nude or sexually explicit photos of yourself on Facebook, the simplest answer you can give them is, "No. It’s not allowed on Facebook." Sharing nude or sexually explicit photos on Facebook goes against our Community Standards. Learn more.
  • If someone is threatening to share things you want to keep private (example: messages, photos), asking you to send them money or anything else, you should contact local law enforcement, block the person and report them. Learn more.
  • If you’re under 18 and someone’s putting pressure on you that’s sex-related, contact local law enforcement or the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children using the CyberTipline at https://report.cybertip.org or 1-800-843-5678. They have advisers available 24/7 to help.
  • If this person is a relative or someone in your household and you need help, contact local law enforcement, go to https://ohl.rainn.org/online or call the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-656-HOPE (4673).
Learn more about staying safe on Facebook. If you're a teen, parent or teacher, you may also want to view tools and tips about bullying prevention.
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If someone is controlling or monitoring your activity on Facebook, you have options. Depending on the circumstances, you could change the privacy settings on your Facebook account so that this person can’t access your information. If this isn't enough, please review our information on bullying.
If this is someone you’re currently in a relationship with, it could be a sign of relationship abuse. Please call the National Domestic Violence helpline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or visit the National Network to End Domestic Violence for information on what to do. If you’re not sure your computer is safe, use a friend's computer or a computer in a public place. To learn more about computer safety, visit the Center for Relationship Abuse Awareness.
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We want to help you find support and take action if you need to. We worked with the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative and ConnectSafely.org on this list of things you can do and organizations you can reach out to for support and advice.
Start here
If someone is threatening to share things you want to keep private, asking you to send them money or anything else, you have options:
  1. Document the post: You may need a record of the post if you decide to take further action. Learn how to take a screenshot.
  2. Report this to local law enforcement.
  3. Report this person to Facebook. Sharing or threatening to share intimate images goes against our Community Standards. If someone is threatening to share things you want to keep private (example: messages, photos, videos), asking you to send money or asking you to do something else you're uncomfortable with, please use the form linked above to report this. Before you submit your report, go to this person's profile and copy their Facebook URL and email. We will ask for this information when you file your report.
  4. Block this person. Depending on your privacy settings, people on Facebook can see a list of your Facebook friends. Once you block someone, they no longer have access to your friend list and won't be able to start conversations with you or see things you post on your profile.
Remember that if somebody asks you to share something you're not comfortable with you have the right to say no.
If you're under 18
If you're under 18, we recommend also talking with a parent or other adult you trust to help you think through what to do. You can also view tips on sharing safely, and talk to a school counselor or administrator who you feel comfortable with.
Where to find additional support
If you, or a friend, are being harassed or harmed online, these organizations should be able to provide support. Many of them offer resources and support specifically for situations when intimate images have been shared without consent. If you're concerned about a friend, please encourage them to reach out directly to the organization as well.
If you or a friend are having thoughts about suicide or self-injury, please contact local emergency services or a suicide helpline instead.
Austria
  • Safer Net
https://www.saferinternet.at/
Belgium
  • Child Focus
http://www.childfocus.be/fr/exploitation-sexuelle/sextortion
Brazil
  • Safernet
http://www.safernet.org.br/site/webline
Canada
  • Kids Help Phone
https://kidshelpphone.ca/
  • MediaSmarts
http://mediasmarts.ca
  • YWCA Canada
http://ywcacanada.ca/en
Croatia
  • HRABRI Telefon
http://www.hrabritelefon.hr/
116 111
  • Centar Za Sigurniji Internet
https://www.csi.hr/
0800 606 606
Cyprus
  • Cyber Ethics
http://www.cyberethics.info/gr/
Czech Republic
  • Czech Safer Internet Centre
http://www.saferinternet.cz/
Denmark
  • Bornetelefonen
https://bornetelefonen.dk/
116 111
  • Red Barnet
https://redbarnet.dk/
Finland
  • Naisten Linja
https://www.naistenlinja.fi/
0800 02400
  • Mannerheimin Lastensuojeluliitto
https://www.nuortennetti.fi/
116 111
Chat: Open from Monday to Wednesday, 17:00 - 20:00
France
  • Centre Hubertine Auclert
https://www.centre-hubertine-auclert.fr/stop-cybersexisme
  • Net Ecoute
http://www.netecoute.fr/
0800 200 000
  • Stop violences femmes
http://www.stop-violences-femmes.gouv.fr/
Germany
  • klicksafe
http://www.klicksafe.de/
  • N.I.N.A. (Nationale Infoline, Netzwerk und Anlaufstelle zu sexueller Gewalt an Mädchen und Jungen)
http://www.nina-info.de/hilfetelefon.html
0800 22 55 530 (The Independent Commissioner for Child Sexual Abuse Issues)
  • Innocence en Danger
http://www.innocenceindanger.de/hilfehotlines/
+49 (0) 30 33007549 (counseling line)
+49 (0) 30 33007538 (regular line)
Greece
  • Hamogelo
https://www.hamogelo.gr/gr/el/home/
1056
India
  • Centre for Social Research
http://www.csrindia.org
Ireland
  • ISPCC Childline
https://www.childline.ie/
  • Women's Aid
https://www.womensaid.ie/
1800 341 900
Israel
  • Eran
http://www.eran.org.il/
Italy
  • Telefono Azzurro
http://www.azzurro.it/
19696
Kenya
  • Childline Kenya
http://www.childlinekenya.co.ke/index.php
254724555251
Luxembourg
  • BEE Secure
https://www.bee-secure.lu/
Mexico
  • Fundación Sofia
https://www.facebook.com/Fundación-Sofía-México-397241687117839
Netherlands
  • Blijf Groep
https://www.blijfgroep.nl/
088 234 24 50
  • Help Wanted
https://www.helpwanted.nl/
  • de Kindertelefoon
https://www.kindertelefoon.nl/
Norway
  • Kors på halsen (for children and youth under 18)
https://www.korspahalsen.no/
800 33 321
Poland
  • 116 111 Telefon Zaufania dla Dzieci i Młodzieży (Fundacja Dajemy Dzieciom Siłę)
https://116111.pl/
116 111
Chat: https://116111.pl/artykul/czat
Portugal
  • Internet Segura
http://www.internetsegura.pt/
800 21 90 90
South Africa
  • Center for Justice and Crime Prevention
http://www.cjcp.org.za/
http://www.cyberbullying.org.za/
021 685 2659
Spain
  • Fundación Anar
https://www.anar.org/
  • Pantallas Amigas
http://www.pantallasamigas.net/
  • Internet Segura 4 Kids (IS4K)
https://www.is4k.es/
900 116 117
Sweden
  • Bris
https://www.bris.se/
0771 50 50 50
United Kingdom
  • The UK Safer Internet Centre
https://www.saferinternet.org.uk/
  • Revenge Porn Helpline
https://revengepornhelpline.org.uk/
0345 600 0459
  • Women's Aid
https://www.womensaid.org.uk/
0808 2000 247
Ukraine
  • La Strada Ukraine (National hotline for preventing domestic violence, human trafficking and gender discrimination)
https://www.facebook.com/childhotline.ukraine/ (children's helpline)
0 800 500 225 (free throughout Ukraine)
116 111 (free of charge from mobile phones, open Monday - Friday, 12:00 to 20:00 and Saturday, 12:00 to 16:00)
https://www.facebook.com/lastradaukraine/ (adult helpline)
0 800 500 335 (free throughout Ukraine)
386 (free of charge from mobile phones, open 24 hours a day)
United States
  • Cyber Civil Rights Initiative
https://www.cybercivilrights.org/
844 878 2274
  • National Network to End Domestic Violence
http://nnedv.org/
Latin America
  • Acoso.Online
https://acoso.online/
For all other countries, please contact:
  • Love Is Respect
http://www.loveisrespect.org/
  • Without My Consent
http://www.withoutmyconsent.org/
What you can do next
  • Contact a crisis helpline or chat service. These can be found all over the US and in many other countries. This is a good option if you want to remain anonymous while deciding what to do. Crisis lines can also often refer you to a victim advocate or other legal adviser near you. In the US, you can visit www.crisischat.org/.
  • Talk with a victim advocate or social worker in your town or city. In the US, there are victim advocates in county offices, police stations, domestic violence prevention centers, rape crisis centers, sheriff's offices and offices of state attorneys general. Victim advocates can help you gather evidence, figure out how to keep you safe and get a civil protection or anti-stalking order against the person threatening you. If you're in the US, call the National Organization for Victim Assistance at 1-800-TRY-NOVA/800-879-6682 or go to www.trynova.org/.
  • Contact a legal aid society or organization near you for free advice.
  • Ask a lawyer or other counselor for advice.
Was this information helpful?
We worked with ConnectSafely.org on the following answer.
If someone is threatening to share personal information about your child (asking for money or anything else), you have options. Here's what you can do:
  • Report this to local law enforcement.
  • Report this person to us. Sharing or threatening to share intimate images goes against our Community Standards.
  • Ask your child to block this person. Depending on your privacy settings, people on Facebook can see a list of your Facebook friends. Once you block someone, they no longer have access to your friend list and won't be able to start conversations with you or see things you post on your profile.
Advice For Parents
Even when they're being threatened, young people are often reluctant to tell trusted adults about sensitive issues. Often they’re afraid or confused about what might happen next. They worry that by speaking up they could make their situation much worse — they could be judged, disciplined, made an example of or publicly criticized by adults.
There is nothing more effective than letting your children know — often and in different ways — that you are there for them no matter what and will respectfully help them work through the issue with each step you take together.
If your child is being threatened, you may need to gather more information about the situation. Get the whole story from your child’s perspective, and then talk to people you both trust to fill in gaps. A legal adviser or victim advocate can help you gather evidence that can be used in a legal case or to get a restraining order, if necessary.
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If you're in immediate physical danger, please contact local law enforcement or a suicide helpline for help.
If you're going through something difficult and the threat isn't immediate, we want you to know there are things you can do right now that may help you.
Talk to someone at a helpline
Suicide Prevention
Self-Injury
Eating Disorders
Reach out to someone you trust
Contact someone you trust, like a family member, friend, counselor or teacher, and ask them to let you share what’s on your mind. For example, you could say, "I'm going through something difficult and was hoping to talk to you about it. If that's OK with you, can you take some time to listen?"
Learn about other ways to support yourself
It can be difficult to focus when you're overwhelmed or can't find a solution to a problem right away. Stop for a moment, take a deep breath and give yourself a break from your feelings.
Try some of these tips from self-care experts at Forefront and the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.
Get out for a while:
  • Go for a walk, jog or bike ride
  • Go to the movies
  • Visit somewhere new, like a coffee shop or museum or park you've never been
Be creative:
  • Draw something simple
  • Make a nice meal
  • Write a short story
Soothe your senses:
  • Meditate or do yoga
  • Take a hot shower
  • Listen to your favorite songs
Relax:
  • Look at the clouds
  • Read a book, magazine or blog post
  • Take a nap
If the tips above don't work for you, see more things you can do right now.
If you have a friend who’s having thoughts about suicide or self-injury, you can share these resources with them as well.
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Suicide helplines provide help to those in need. Contact a helpline if you need support yourself or need help supporting a friend. If you're concerned about a friend, please encourage the person to contact a helpline as well.
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The Facebook Network of Support (NOS) is comprised of six leading LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) advocacy organizations. These organizations serve in a consultative capacity to Facebook on issues like anti-LGBTQ bullying. Learn more about these organizations:
  • GLAAD rewrites the script for LGBTQ acceptance. As a dynamic media force, GLAAD tackles tough issues to shape the narrative and provoke dialogue that leads to cultural change. GLAAD protects all that has been accomplished and creates a world where everyone can live the life they love.
  • GLSEN champions safe and affirming schools for all students. We envision a world in which every child learns to respect and accept all people, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity/expression.
  • The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) is America's largest civil rights organization working to achieve lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality.
  • The National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE) is the nation’s leading social justice advocacy organization winning life-saving change for transgender people.
  • PFLAG promotes the health and well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons, their families and friends.
  • The Trevor Project is the leading national organization focused on crisis and suicide prevention efforts among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth.
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For a Friend
If someone reaches out to you for help, respond and let them know you’re there for them. The best protection against bullying is to learn how to recognize it and deal with it. Here are some tips about what you should — and shouldn’t — do if your friend is being bullied:
  • Document and report it. Help your friend report the post to Facebook. You may also want to take screenshots of any abusive posts, comments or messages in case there's an ongoing issue or you need to show them to someone later. Your friend may also want to unfriend or block this person.
  • Offer support. Ask your friend what you can do to support them, but don’t speak for your friend unless they ask you to.
  • Stay calm. Try to help your friend avoid escalating the problem or acting aggressively. If you and your friend agree that the incident wasn’t a big deal, suggest they let it go. Bullies are often just looking for a reaction, so not giving them one may discourage this kind of behavior in the future.
  • Remind your friend they're not alone. Let your friend know that you want to help them handle this. Remind your friend that they haven’t done anything to deserve this and that bullying can happen to anyone.
  • Don’t keep it a secret. If your friend needs additional support, encourage them to reach out to someone they trust to talk about the situation. If you’re worried about your friend’s safety, tell someone immediately.
If you're a teen, parent or teacher, visit Facebook's Bullying Prevention Hub for more information, tools and resources.
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We worked with the National Eating Disorders Association and Dr. Nancy Zucker, Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke on the following answer.
If a friend posted something that suggests they may have an eating disorder and need help, we ask that you report the post to us so we can reach out to them and offer support. Please note that we'll remove content that promotes or encourages eating disorders. You can visit the Facebook Community Standards to learn more.
You can also offer support. Here are some tips about what you should — and shouldn’t — do if you think your friend may be struggling with an eating disorder:
Do:
  • Check in with your friend about how they’re feeling. For example, you could say, "How have you been doing lately? I’m always happy to listen if there’s anything you need to talk about."
  • Use "I" statements. For example, you could say, "I'm concerned because you didn’t eat breakfast and lunch."
  • If your friend doesn’t want to share or says there’s no reason for you to be concerned, let them know that you care and will be happy to listen if they ever need to talk.
  • Spend time with your friend to show that you care about them (example: talk, watch a movie).
  • Set an example with your own life. Also, don’t make negative comments about your own or other people’s appearances.
  • If your friend says they're not doing well, ask them if they’ve considered talking with a counselor, doctor, nutritionist or other health professional. For example, you could say, "I don't know if this will help, but have you considered talking to a doctor about this?" You can also suggest that they take a free, anonymous online assessment to help them understand their risk of an eating disorder.
Don't:
  • Use accusatory "you" statements, like "You’re not taking care of yourself."
  • Place shame, blame or guilt on your friend about their appearance or actions.
  • Give simple solutions, like "If you’d stop dieting, everything would be fine!"
  • Expect to cure your friend.
For more information about eating disorders, contact the National Eating Disorders Association:
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If someone you know is in danger, please contact local emergency services for help immediately. After you've called emergency services, connect with your friend or call someone who can. Showing that you care matters. Make sure they know that you're there for them, and that they aren't alone.
If the threat of physical danger isn't immediate, there are things you can do to help:
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Suicide helplines provide help to those in need. Contact a helpline if you need support yourself or need help supporting a friend. If you're concerned about a friend, please encourage the person to contact a helpline as well.
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If you've encountered a direct threat of suicide on Facebook, please contact local emergency services or a suicide helpline immediately.
The Trevor Project specializes in suicide prevention for LGBT youth and offers a lifeline that people in the US can contact by calling 1-866-488-7386. The Trevor Project also offers resources for concerned friends and family members of LGBT youth. Learn more about The Trevor Project on their website: http://www.thetrevorproject.org/.
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The Facebook Network of Support (NOS) is comprised of six leading LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) advocacy organizations. These organizations serve in a consultative capacity to Facebook on issues like anti-LGBTQ bullying. Learn more about these organizations:
  • GLAAD rewrites the script for LGBTQ acceptance. As a dynamic media force, GLAAD tackles tough issues to shape the narrative and provoke dialogue that leads to cultural change. GLAAD protects all that has been accomplished and creates a world where everyone can live the life they love.
  • GLSEN champions safe and affirming schools for all students. We envision a world in which every child learns to respect and accept all people, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity/expression.
  • The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) is America's largest civil rights organization working to achieve lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality.
  • The National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE) is the nation’s leading social justice advocacy organization winning life-saving change for transgender people.
  • PFLAG promotes the health and well-being of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons, their families and friends.
  • The Trevor Project is the leading national organization focused on crisis and suicide prevention efforts among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth.
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If a friend or family member is planning suicide or you've seen a direct threat of suicide on Facebook, please contact your local emergency services or a suicide helpline immediately. We also ask that you tell us if you see something that suggests suicide or self-injury on Facebook.
The Veterans Crisis Line provides customized support to members of the military community, including veterans, active duty service members and their families. Support is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.
You can contact them by:
Additional resources available to the military community include:
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